Quincy University -- TPS -- Primary Source Sets -- World War II: Pearl Harbor [December 2009]

Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources at Quincy University

 

The following are resources selected from the Library of Congress on a specific topic.

World War II:
Pearl Harbor

 

Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. A small boat rescues a seaman from the 31,800 ton USS West Virginia burning in the foreground. Smoke rolling out amidships shows where the most extensive damage occurred. Note the two men in the superstructure. The USS Tennessee is inboard. (1941). from Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/owi2001045668/PP/

 

Before War:

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Dry dock, Pearl Habor [sic], H.T.. (1919)

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U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Magazine, East of intersection of Yorktown & Saratoga Boulev, Pearl Harbor, Honolulu County, HI

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U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Headquarters Building, North Road, between Fourteenth Street & North Road, Pearl Harbor, Honolulu County, HI

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U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Grandstand, Long Way at Russell Way, Pearl Harbor, Honolulu County, HI

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U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Barracks, Beckoning Point, southwest of Sierra Mooring Platf, Pearl Harbor, Honolulu County, HI

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U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Navy Exchange Garage, Corner of North Road & Nimitz Street, Pearl Harbor, Honolulu County, HI

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U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Warehouses, Various locations throughout base, Pearl Harbor, Honolulu County, HI

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U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Submarine Dive Tower, Intersection of Clark & Morton Streets, Pearl Harbor, Honolulu County, HI

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U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Telephone Exchange Building, Morton Street near Clark Street, Pearl Harbor, Honolulu County, HI

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U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Chapel, Corner of Oakley & Nimitz Street, Pearl Harbor, Honolulu County, HI

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U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Damage Control Building, West end of Hancock Avenue, Pearl Harbor, Honolulu County, HI

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Naval Magazine Lualualei, West Loch Branch, Magazine Type 2, Fourth Place, Seventh & Eighth Streets, Pearl Harbor, Honolulu County, HI

 

During the War:

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Above and beyond the call of duty--Dorie Miller received the Navy Cross at Pearl Harbor, May 27, 1942 / David Stone Martin.

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Naval dispatch from the Commander in Chief Pacific (CINCPAC) announcing the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, 7 December 1941.

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Pearl Harbor bombing. Nevada underway. Severely damaged and beached during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the USS Nevada gets ready to leave her Hawaiian anchorage for permanent repairs at a U.S. port. Temporary repairs made at Pearl Harbor enabled the battleship to make the voyage under her own power. (1942)

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Pearl Harbor bombing. USS Utah. Rescue parties are working on openings in the hull of the USS Utah, a target ship sent to the bottom of Pearl Harbor during the Japanese air attacks. (1942)

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Pearl Harbor bombing. USS California. The 32,000 ton battleship, USS California is shown being towed to drydock at Pearl Harbor, T.H. This ship was raised from her shallow resting place by means of cofferdams. (1942)

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Pearl Harbor bombing. Wrecked seaplane. One of the 80 U.S. Navy planes wrecked by Japanese bombs and bullets during the air attacks on Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941. The plane was an OS2U, an Observation Scout built by Vought-Sikorsky.

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Pearl Harbor bombing. USS Raleigh. Torpedoed and bombed, the 7,050 ton light crusier USS Raleigh is held afloat near her anchorage in Pearl Harbor by a barge. The capsized USS Utah is in the background. The Raleigh rejoined the fleet months ago.

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Pearl Harbor bombing. Hangar fire. Japanese bombs wrecked and fired this hangar at the U.S. naval air station, Pearl Harbor, in addition to causing extensive damage to planes on the apron and runways, several of which may be seen in the foreground.

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Pearl Harbor bombing. Drydock bound. The USS West Virginia, sunk at her berth by Japanese torpedoes and bombs during the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, was raised sufficiently to enable her to be towed to drydock. She is shown here being maneuvered by tugs, preliminary to the start of repairs.

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Pearl Harbor bombing. California hit. Battered by aerial bombs and torpedoes, the USS California settles slowly into the mud and muck of Pearl Harbor. Clouds of black, oily smoke pouring up from the California and her stricken sister ships conceal all but the hull of the capsized USS Oklahoma at the extreme right.

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Pearl Harbor bombing. Burning oil. Streaming from the shattered fuel tanks, oil turned parts of Pearl Harbor into a sea of flames, following the Japanese attacks. This picture was taken from near the naval air station boat landing. Barely visible through the smoke area are a damaged U.S. battleship and the capsized USS Oklahoma.

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Pearl Harbor bombing. Raider is hit. The Japanese bomber, a thin line of smoke trailing in the wake, was struck by anti-aircraft fire during the attack on Pearl Harbor. More than 100 Jap planes are estimated to have taken part in the attacks, at least 28 of which were shot down by U.S. Navy gunners.

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Pearl Harbor bombing. Naval air station. This is the wreckage-strewn naval air station at Pearl Harbor following one of the Japanese sneak attacks on the morning of December 7, 1941. In the background, an explosion sends a mass of flames and smoke high in the sky.

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Pearl Harbor bombing. USS Oklahoma. Rescue crews are shown here working on the upturned hull of the 29,000 ton battleship USS Oklahoma, which capsized in Pearl Harbor after being blasted by Japanese warplanes. Holes were burned through the hull to permit the rescue of some of the men trapped below. Note one of the Oklahoma's launches in the foreground. The battleship, USS Maryland is in the background.

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Pearl Harbor bombing. After the fire. Battered by aerial torpedoes and bomb hits, the 31,800 ton USS West Virginia (nearest ship) rests on the bottom of Pearl Harbor. Fire following the explosions as well as oil flames from the nearby sunken USS Arizona added extensively to the damage. Noted the wrecked scout plane topside of gun turret at right and the overturned plane in the right hand corner. The battleship USS Tennessee is in the background.

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Pearl Harbor bombing. USS Nevada. Beached at Hospital Point.

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Pearl Harbor bombing. USS Vestal. This U.S. repair ship, twice bombed by Japanese fliers, was beached after the ship started flooding. The Vestal has since been repaired.

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Recreation building at housing area three for civil service employees at Pearl Harbor navy yard. This building houses a Marine theatre, a library and is adjacent to a large beer garden.

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Pearl Harbor bombing. USS Maryland. Moored inboard of the USS Oklahoma, which capsized, the 31,500 ton Maryland was damaged slightly and was one of the first ships to rejoin the fleet after the Japanese attack.

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Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. A small boat rescues a seaman from the 31,800 ton USS West Virginia burning in the foreground. Smoke rolling out amidships shows where the most extensive damage occurred. Note the two men in the superstructure. The USS Tennessee is inboard.

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Wreckage of USS Arizona, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

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Pearl Harbor bombing. Stricken from the air. Testifying to the extent of the Japanese sneak attacks are these three stricken U.S. battleships. Left to right: USS West Virginia, severely damaged; USS Tennessee, damaged; and USS Arizona, sunk.

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Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. USS West Virginia aflame. Disregarding the dangerous possibilities of explosions, United States sailors man their boats at the side of the burning battleship, USS West Virginia, to better fight the flames started by Japanese torpedoes and bombs. Note the national colors flying against the smoke-blackened sky.

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USS Arizona, at height of fire, following Japanese aerial attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

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Pearl Harbor bombing. USS West Virginia a flame. Disregarding the dangerous possibilities of explosions, U.S. sailors man their boats at the side of the burning battleship, USS West Virginia, to better fight the flames started by Japanese torpedoes and bombs. Note the national colors flying against the smoke-blackend sky.

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Pearl Harbor bombing. Seaman rescued. A small boat rescues a seaman from the 31,800 ton USS West Virginia burning in the foreground. Smoke rolling out amidships shows where the most extensive damage occurred. Note the two men in the superstructure. The USS Tennessee is inboard.

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Pearl Harbor bombing. USS Shaw. Hit by three bombs which exploded her forward magazine, the 1,500 ton destroyer Shaw lies a twisted mass of wreckage in the heavily-bombed floating drydock YFD-2. Note the bow of the Shaw lying on its side in the foreground. Part of the drydock, at right, is under water while the other side is listing heavily. Both the Shaw and the drydock are now back in use.

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Pearl Harbor bombing. USS Downes and Cassin. The jumbled mass of wreckage in the foreground of drydock number one are the U.S. destroyers, Downes (left) and Cassin (right). The battleship in the rear is the USS Pennsylvania, 33,100 ton flagship of the Pacific Fleet, which suffered relatively light damage during the Japanese attack. The Pennsylvania was repaired shortly after the attack. Main and auxiliary machinery fittings of the Downes and Cassin are being transferred to new hulls.

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California hit. Battered by aerial bombs and torpedoes, the U.S.S. California settles slowly into the mud and muck of Pearl Harbor. Clouds of black oily smoke pouring up from the California and her stricken sister ships conceal all but the hulk of the capsized U.S.S. Oklahoma at extreme right.

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Leaves berth virtually surrounded by stricken ships. The U.S.S. Neosho, navy oil tanker, cautiously backs away from her berth (right center) in a successful effort to escape the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Dec. 7, 1941. At left the battleship U.S.S. California lists after aerial blows. Other crippled warships and part of the hull of the capsized U.S.S. Oklahoma may be seen in the background. The Neosho was later sunk in the Coral Sea.

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Women aircraft workers. Two Pearl Harbor widows work to defeat the Axis at a West Coast aircraft plnat. Mrs. Fern Evans, left and Mrs. Evelyn J. W. Casola work as a team on the riveting of radio support assemblies for bomber planes. Neither had previous mechanical experience prior to this job, but both are now successfully handling complicated mechanical jobs.

 

From the Collection- After the Day of Infamy: "Man-on-the-Street" Interviews Following the Attack on Pearl Harbor:

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Denver, Colorado, December 1941 (Recording)

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Burlington, North Carolina, December 8, 1941 (Recording)

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Bloomington, Indiana, December 10, 1941 (Recording)

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"Dear Mr. President", Tucson, Arizona, January or February 1942 (Recording)

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"Dear Mr. President", Detroit, Michigan, January or February 1942 (Recording)

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"Dear Mr. President", Granbury, Austin, and Hood County, Texas, January or February 1942 (Recording)

 

After the War:

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U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Signal Tower, Corner of Seventh Street & Avenue D east of Drydoc, Pearl Harbor, Honolulu County, HI

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U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ward Field Grandstand, 750 feet southwest of Merry Point Landing, Pearl Harbor, Honolulu County, HI

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U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Jet Engine Fuel Storage Tank, Lehua Avenue, Pearl City Peninsula, Pearl Harbor, Honolulu County, HI

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U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Jet Engine Fuel Storage Tank, Lehua Avenue, Pearl City Peninsula, Pearl Harbor, Honolulu County, HI

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U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Submarine Base, Wharf S-21, Hurt Avenue at northwest side of Magazine Loch, Pearl Harbor, Honolulu County, HI